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Harry Potter - Not Just for Kids

The Harry Potter books appeal to people of all ages

Are you an adult and a closet Harry Potter fan?

You're not alone. Many adults are captivated by the magical world of wizardry created by JK Rowling, but just a wee bit embarrassed to admit to being fans of a children's book series.

It may begin as a parent who read the books that their children are interested in or taking the kids to see the movies. What they quickly discover within the Harry Potter saga is the same combination of talent, excellent writing skills, intelligence and imagination that have made Jules Verne, Tolkien and Steven King household names.

The fantasy world of Harry Potter created by JK Rowling is a cover for in-depth explorations of major moral issues. The good guys fight the bad guys - and while a semblance of victory does seem to come to the forces on the moral high ground, it is never a certainty and never an absolute win. Good and evil coexist and balance each other in these books, much the same as they do in real life.

Harry Potter booksRowling went through a bad divorce and a long hard spell of single parenting while the books were taking shape in her imagination. These experiences add an adult spice to the world of her wizards. There are no easy answers and no glorious triumphs of good. Every victory in the Harry Potter books has a price. They are bought with suffering and loss. The acceptance of these realities by the characters becomes more clear with each of the books.

Children read the Harry Potter novels and relate to the young wizards, the cute fantasy animals and their thrilling adventures. So do grownups, but adults see much more in the interactions of the characters so cunningly crafted by Rowling.

The people who populate these books are real characters. They have flaws and make mistakes. They often wonder if they have chosen the right course of action... and if they haven't there are consequences. Children and adults share the hope that these brave people and otherworldly creatures will struggle though to the end and learn to survive. Their survival is a bright hope that in the more mundane world of reality there can be a balance of good and evil. There may be losses suffered by the good people. There may be pain and even death, but in the final analysis the good guys will be just a bit stronger, a smidgen more clever and a whole lot luckier.

"Harry Potter offers hope mixed with reality - a very multi-layered, adult concept."

At the end of each book, the weary team of good guys gathers itself for a short celebration knowing that the next battle is coming, but not ready to throw in the towel and let the dark forces take over. For any adult living in the present that should sound like a very familiar process.

No matter how often terror strikes, tsunamis and earthquakes destroy thousands,or illness threatens to strike at loved ones...somehow most adults hang on to the good in the world and continue to believe in a better tomorrow.

Harry Potter adventures touch that nerve in grownups. In creating Voldemort as a powerful and cunning, but controlled, focus of evil she offers the lesson that horrors can be contained. She allows the world to look for a Dumbledore, wise and patient, to lead the fight to survive as moral beings able to cherish each other and the creatures who live in the world. Whether in person, or in spirit, this archetype of the wise mentor leads by teaching how to find the way, giving tools for life success in any undertaking.

She gives us classical tragedy modeled on ancient Greek plays and drama based on Shakespeare. Characters painfully learn, with each new battle, that people and choices are never quite as simple as they seem. She offers hope mixed with reality - a very multi-layred, adult concept.

So, go stand on the lines with the kids to buy the Harry Potter books and see the movies without feeling embarrassed. It may be fantasy, but that doesn't mean it isn't good literature. There are quite a few brilliant and mature adults who are cheering for Harry Potter along with you.

Also see -> Life Lessons from Harry Potter

More about adult Harry Potter fans around the Web:

Adult Harry Potter Fans - Facebook

You Know You're Really an Adult Harry Potter Fan When...

 

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