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MAIN Arrow to BusinessBusiness Arrow to Office Life Office Life Arrow to Job HuntingJob Hunting

3 Steps to an Easier Online Job Search

looking for a job onlineLearn these three steps to an easier online job search, plus discover websites that show you the hidden job market...

You spend all day in front of the computer looking at job listings and fine-tuning your resume. But all you get is a headache. How can you give your online job search an advantage?

An Easier Online Job Search: 3 Steps

STEP 1 - Pick Your Niche
Brush up on your job-hunting skills. The Internet has excellent inside tips on the state of the job market in numerous industries. Before you go online to find available positions, take a serious look at what you want to do and where you want to do it. Be realistic, but don't undersell yourself. You may be able to bypass the "entry level" log jam by building on skills from part-time jobs, hobbies or volunteer work.

STEP 2 - Talk the Talk
Every industry insider speaks in jargon. If you want to pick up the insider accent, try reading top industry blogs or following pros on Twitter. Learn all the keywords and categories relevant to the position you're seeking, or the special skill set you have to offer. For instance, if you want to write technical manuals, you might want to try terms such as "help docs" or "documentation developer" in addition to the more standard "technical writer."

STEP 3 - Tailor Your Resume
Once you've learned the important keywords associated with the position you're seeking and the jargon associated with your skills, make sure to put them in the information you upload to the jobs search websites. If these keywords aren't in your profile, how is a potential employer searching through the database of applicants going to find you?

Where to Start Online Job Searches

 

Are you looking in the right places? Everyone goes to the major job search websites like Monster.com -- and they should, since these sites have more job listings. Ending your job search there would be a mistake. Here are some other sites you should also check out to find jobs online:

  • The website for the company you would like to work for. There are even 'meta' job search websites that include the online job postings of large companies.

  • 'Meta' online job search sites, which collect listings from numerous other jobs search sites. That means thousands of listings without having to go to hundreds of sites.

  • Recruiters' websites. Mass-emailing resumes to employers can be a waste of time -- and might technically violate laws against sending unsolicited messages. You don't want to start out your job search as a spammer. Instead, use one of the web services that will send your resume to recruiters, rather than employers. Recruiters are actually happy to get your resume since they know what to do with it.

  • Good employment agencies, which are often simply two or more recruiters or headhunters working together, can be hard to find. The good news is that they usually advertise on job search websites. If you see a job listing that is unusually vague, it may be an employment agency. If you apply, you may be considered for other jobs that the agency has to fill.

  • Linked-In has been getting some positive reviews as a job networking tool. You can set up a profile and start adding others who already work in your field or are looking for positions. Many companies hire based on employee recommendations. A linked-in contact who is looking for work now may be a future job referral. One word of caution. Top industry people usually don't like strangers trying to add them as contacts or friends. Stick to people who will reciprocate your contact and you may find yourself networking to the top.


Author... Joel Walsh

More about online job hunting around the Web:


Ten Tips for a Successful Online Job Search

The Dirty Dozen Online Job Search Mistakes

Related Job Hunting Resources ->

Looking for a Job on the Internet Resume Success
Success with Job Interviews How to Write a Cover Letter
Recovering from a Layoff How to Write a Resignation Letter
Find a Job by Networking Summer Jobs for Teens

 

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