Chiff.com

The web, reviewed by humans since 1999.






Health
health navigation menu
alternative medicine
birth & pregnancy
child development
childhood rashes
dieting
diseases
health & fitness
health & nutrition
human body
kids' health
men's health
mental health
pain relief
plastic surgery
rashes
senior health
teens health
vitamins
women's health

MAIN Arrow to Health Health Arrow to Disease Diseases Arrow to Erectile Dysfunction Information Erectile Dysfunction

Viagra, Levitra, Cialis - Are They Safe?

When the news about Viagra broke in late March of 1998, it sent Pfizer stock through the roof. Men began talking about a subject that had never been openly discussed. Impotence. Bob Dole was a willing spokesperson, appearing in television ads for Viagra explaining that ED or erectile dysfunction was a common problem in men, nothing to be embarrassed about - and at long last...curable!

viagra, cialis, levitraA series of commercials with race car drivers and other macho men praising the virtues of the new wonder drug followed. It didn't take long for others to enter this lucrative market. Bayer Pharmaceuticals Corporation, GlaxoSmithKline and Schering Corporation coreleased Levitra (vardenafil HCl). Cialis (tadalafil), nicknamed "le weekend" by amorous Frenchmen, was Lilly ICOS's offering. Propecia and uprima as well as several unlicensed copycat drugs flooded the market.

The competition was on for the lion's share of the multi-million dollar impotence drug market and the drug company marketing departments were not eager to introduce the news of any unpleasant side effects.

From the beginning, some side effects were reported. Some were mildly annoying, like the bluish tinge men reported seeing after taking Viagra. Some were much more serious. In fact, Pfizer warned doctors not to prescribe Viagra to men with certain medical conditions. The dangers were made very public when several patients using Viagra died from heart attacks. These impotence drugs work by increasing the flow of blood to the genital area and while more blood flowing to some organs is a good thing, for men with heart conditions or at risk of a stroke it could - and did - prove fatal.

The official Cialis Web site (http://www.cialis.com/index.jsp) carries the warning:

If you take nitrates, often used for chest pain (angina) do not take CIALIS. Such combinations could cause a sudden, unsafe drop in blood pressure. Don't drink alcohol in excess (to a level of intoxication) with CIALIS. This combination may increase your chances of getting dizzy or lowering your blood pressure. CIALIS does not protect a man or his partner from sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV.

The most common side effects with Cialis were headache and upset stomach. Backache or muscle ache were also reported, sometimes with delayed onset. Most men weren't bothered by the side effects enough to stop taking CIALIS. As with any prescription ED tablet, in the rare event of an erection lasting more than 4 hours (priapism), seek immediate medical attention to avoid long-term injury. Discuss your medical conditions and medications, including alpha blockers prescribed for prostate problems or high blood pressure, with your doctor to ensure CIALIS is right for you and that you are healthy enough for sexual activity.

As the use of these drugs continued, other possible side effects were reported. More than seven years after impotence drugs became available, a suspected link between the used of ED medications and blindness was discovered. A condition called NAION or non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy was reported in 43 men using various drugs for erectile dysfunction. That annoying bluish tinge may have been more serious than anyone recognized.

An article in an optomology journal (Nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy developing soon after use of sildenafil (viagra): a report of seven new cases.) had alerted the FDA to a possible problem, but the vision problem may be related to the same conditions that caused the impotence and not to the use of the ED drugs. With only 43 cases on file it is difficult to draw a connection between the drugs and the vision loss. According to Pfizer, Viagra has been used by 23 million men worldwide since its approval in 1998. Out of those many millions 38 cases of blindness in one eye have followed the use of Viagra. There were four reported for for Cialis and one for Levitra.

The bottom line with ED drugs, as with all drugs, is that they are a mix of good and bad. If you need to take them and are healthy, you should be fine. Don't take any drugs without an examination by your own doctor and a prescription. If you notice any unusual side effects - report them immediately to your doctor.


More about ED drugs around the Web:

Sildenafil - Wikipedia - Extensive overview of the active ingredient in Viagra, Cialis, and other erectile disfunction prescription drugs with information on how it works, side effects, contraindications, and drug interactions with related photos, resources.

Sildenafil Citrate Information - National Library of Medicine information portal with a history of its use and information for consumers and healthcare professionals.

Erectile Dysfunction: Cialis, Levitra, Staxyn, and Viagra to Treat ED - WebMD guide with comparisons of the various ED drugs including specific side effects, including related resources on causes and treatment of sexual dysfunction in men.



Sponsored Links

Sponsored Links

 
 

chiff.com

Privacy  |  Mission Statement  |  Contact us |  Sitemap

All contents copyright © Chiff.com 1999 - 2017