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MAIN Arrow to HealthHealth Arrow to DiseaseDiseases Arrow to Sexually Transmitted Disease STDs Arrow to Chlamydia Chlamydia

Among 19 to 25-year-olds, chlamydia (pronounced kluh-mid-ee-uh) is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases with an estimated 3 million new cases reported each year in the U.S. each year.

Although highly contagious, chlamydia can only be transmitted through intimate contact via semen or vaginal secretions.

How to make sure you don't get chlamydia? Avoid casual sex, and alway use condoms with new sexual partners.

Early signs of chlamydia may either be very mild or go completely unnoticed. What raises most concern among medical professionals is what happens if chlamydia goes untreated.

Since noticeable chlamydia symptoms may not appear for several months, the medical community have dubbed the disease "the silent epidemic."

Chlamydia symptoms, diagnosis and treatment

As the condition worsens over time, symptoms may appear as:

In females

• Vaginal discharge
• Painful urination
• Abdominal discomfort
• Bleeding between menstrual cycles
In males

• Cloudy or watery discharge from the penis
• Painful urination
• Testicular pain or discomfort

Once a patient is suspected of being infected, chlamydia can be easily diagnosed with a simple urine test, and treatable in a majority of cases with a single course of antibiotics.

If left untreated, the infection begins to travel throughout the body, developing in females the real risk of even more serious conditions such as pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) or infertility. Infected women who become pregnant may even unknowingly pass it on to their unborn child.

In males, an untreated infection may result in scar tissue developing in the passage tube that allows sperm to travel out of the penis. For anyone who is infected, chlamydia lowers the body's ability to fight off other infections and more than doubles their risk of HIV.

Around the Web, find out more about the risks and complications associated with this common STD, information on what other serious conditions may come as a result, along with tips on warning signs and symptoms, and related chlamydia tests and treatments ...


More about chlamydia around the Web:



Chlamydia
- This is an excellent online guide to the topic with extensive information & links to related resources on symptoms, causes, advice on when to seek medical care, treatments, related complications and follow-up care.

Chlamydia Tests - Find descriptions of common tests for chlamydia via samples of urine or body fluids from infected areas, how to prepare for testing and what it's like, details on how results are determined, plus advice on follow-up care.

Genital Chlamydia - The major focus here is on other diseases & complications which may result from chlamydia including infertility, ectopic pregnancy, pelvic inflammatory disease, reactive arthritis and HIV.

STD Facts - Chlamydia - Basic fact sheet on the topic covering causes, symptoms, diagnosis, complications, with information on chlamydia's effects on pregnant women and newborns, with links to further facts & statistics from Centers for Disease Control.

STDs - Chlamydia - Check out a teen-friendly overview with facts on who is at risk and how it's transmitted, description of symptoms in teen boys and girls, plus information on what happens if the disease is left untreated, with links to related articles and resources.

Chlamydia Facts - UK guide with information and advice on signs & symptoms in women and men, common tests & diagnosis, when to seek medical care, how it's treated, tips on prevention, with brief related statistics on occurrences in the UK and Europe.

This information is intended as reference and not as medical advice.
All treatment decisions should be made by medical professionals.


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