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Olympics 2018
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Olympic Luge
© LaPresse

The luge or sled dates back to ancient Scandinavia where hollowed-out tree trucks may have been used as prehistoric transport.

The first historical evidence for the luge (French, for sled) dates to the Dark Ages in Norway, where sleds were used for fun, or as an easy way to transport people and materials.

As a sport, luge events were first held in St. Petersburg, Russia in the 16th century. Its popularity soon spread throughout Europe. But it wasn't until 1833 that the first official games involving 21 competitors were held in Davos, Switzerland.

A century later, the first world championship attracted over 50 athletes from around Europe, bringing the sport official recognition with founding of the International Luge Federation in 1957. Inclusion as an official Olympic sport only came in 1964 at the Innsbruck Games.

Today, Olympic luge is held over two rounds with fastest times that are determined in thousandths of seconds.

Achieving speeds of up to 90 miles an hour sometimes results in a spill, as athletes are separated from their sled. However, unlike Olympic bobsled, lugers have to hold on tight - and not only to avoid injuries. Arriving at the finish line without their sled means that they will face automatic disqualification.


Canada - CBC Olympics CBC

February 2018 Olympic Luge Schedule & Medal Events
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luge       event final   event final event final event final                    

scheduled event   medal event event final

 


DID YOU KNOW? Olympic luge fun facts


Downhill racers at Skyline Luge in Calgary, Canada

• Although the US team often come up against stiff competition from their European rivals, they made Olympic luge history at the 1998 Nagano Games, when they won the silver and bronze medals in the doubles event. It was the first medals for the American luge team in 34 years.

• The popularity of Olympic luge has spawned an extreme sport called street luge that is popular with skateboarders. Riders use sleds similar to those seen in the Winter Olympics, but they use wheels instead of runners. Street lugers can go up to 60 miles an hour speeding down the pavement.

• If you want to personally experience the thrill of the sport make your way to Skyline Luge in Calgary, Canada which offers the world's longest luge track (5905 ft) for kids of all ages.


More about Olympic luge around the Web:



International Olympic Committee - Luge
- Overview of luge competitions, list of events, Olympic records, Flash presentation, athlete profiles, picture gallery, related links.

Canadian Luge Association - Team and athlete profiles, news, results and standings, schedule of events.

USALuge.org - The official site featuring news, athlete profiles, information on sponsored programs, membership info, American luge club contact details, related links.

 

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