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Olympics 2018
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Olympic Skeleton event
© LaPresse

No bones about it, Skeleton is the event which is likely to take your breath away - as athletes speed face down on their sleds, staring death square in the face as the force of gravity shoots them literally headlong at 80 mph around some of the sharpest and iciest corners in sport.

Little is known about the early origins of skeleton, but the first documented dare devils to execute it was at St. Moritz in 1887, a natural evolution of tobogganing and bobsleighing so popular at the time.

The first skeleton runs were natural tracks, but later the straight downhill courses were modified by adding curves to make the sport more challenging.

The aerodynamics of the prone skeleton position resulted in incredible speeds, and soon everyone was competing in the same way, leading to the evolution of a lighter weight and streamlined sled dubbed the "skeleton" today resembling nothing more than an oversized cafeteria tray!

"Skeleton" first appeared in the Olympic program in 1928, and then again in 1948, both times in St. Moritz, Switzerland. The sport returned to Olympics again at Salt Lake City in 2002 when local favorite skeleton champ Jimmy Shea, Jr. took home the gold.


Canada - CBC Olympics CBC

February 2018 Olympic Skeleton Schedule & Medal Events
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scheduled event   medal event event final


DID YOU KNOW? Olympic skeleton fun facts

Skeleton olympic games 2010
Racing down the Olympic skeleton track
at speeds reaching 80 miles per hour.


• "Sled head" is the term for skeleton riders who have suffered too many concussions. Skeleton riders on rough tracks and whose heads are exposed to knocks along the wall can do serious damage to their craniums if they're not careful.

• Reaching speeds at upwards of 80 mph, racers can experience 5G of pressure (equivalent to a space shuttle takeoff) in almost all of 14 to 17 turns that make up a skeleton track.

• It's often debated which one is the most exciting sport - luge or skeleton? The most visible difference between the two sports is that luge racers go feet first. Skeleton athletes go face first -- with their chins one inch from the ice surface.

 

More about Olympic skeleton around the Web:



International Olympic Committee - Skeleton
- Check out an overview of the men's and women's competitions, list of events, Olympic records, athlete profiles, and picture gallery

FIBT Bobsleigh and Skeleton - International Federation offering news & pictures, sport history, rules and regulations, race schedules, records and results, TV schedule, related links.

USA Bobsled and Skeleton Federation - National governing body featuring news, photos, athlete profiles, bobsled an skeleton history, records and results, related resources.


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