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MAIN Arrow to Home LifeHealth Arrow to Vitamins and Minerals Vitamins & Minerals Arrow to GermaniumGermanium

germanium supplementGermanium Fast Facts

Foods: beans, garlic, tuna, oysters

Nutritional & health benefits: studies suggest its use as an anti-inflammatory agent and overall benefit to the immune system

Germanium, which is known as Ge on the periodic table, is a trace mineral that has a number of potential health benefits. Germanium was widely studied up until the 1980s, but for a number of reasons this research was largely discontinued, and so many of the purported health benefits that germanium provides have not been thoroughly tested.

That is changing, however, and germanium is being examined by the scientific community once again.

One supposed health benefit of germanium is that it helps treat HIV. Another purported health benefit of germanium is as a treatment of cancer. Proponents says that germanium does not actually fight cancer itself. Instead, germanium is what is called a biological response modifier, which means that it boosts the immune system, making the system more effective at fighting cancer tumors.

Because germanium boosts the immune system, it is believed that it might have a similar positive effect on a number of other degenerative illnesses such as osteoporosis.

While science is rediscovering the health benefits of germanium, it should be noted that it can be mildly toxic even at doses only marginally over the recommended daily intake, and so care and research should be undertaken when supplementing with germanium. Most good alternative doctors will take a hair sample to see if your body is depleted in the mineral first before prescribing a supplement or giving nutrition counseling.

For those looking to naturally boost their intake, there are many foods which contain a significant amount of germanium, including beans, garlic, tuna, and oysters.

More information about germanium around the Web:

GERMANIUM: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions and Warnings - WebMD

 

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